Lunch Time For The Sprit
rhamphotheca:

Work in Turtle Conservation
In Myanmar, the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Turtle Survival alliance worked to build an incubation facility for the critically endangered Burmese roofed turtles (Batagur trivittata) and their eggs to help populations in the wild grow and sustain themselves.
Find out more here: Roofed Turtle Project
(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

rhamphotheca:

Work in Turtle Conservation

In Myanmar, the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Turtle Survival alliance worked to build an incubation facility for the critically endangered Burmese roofed turtles (Batagur trivittata) and their eggs to help populations in the wild grow and sustain themselves.

Find out more here: Roofed Turtle Project

(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

creatures-alive:

(via Keel-billed Toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus) perched under the rai by Chris Jimenez / 500px)

cool-critters:

Spanner crab (Ranina ranina)

The Spanner crab can be found throughout tropical and subtropical habitats. Although Ranina ranina is a target of commercial fishing operations, little is known about the species’ biology, population dynamics and ecology. It is mainly nocturnal, and remains buried in the sand during the day. When waiting for prey Ranina ranina will cover itself with sand, but leave its eye and mouth parts sticking out to help detect its food.

photo credits: noosafoodie, nsw, wiki

rhamphotheca:

Saving Asia’s other endangered cats

by Jeremy Hance

t’s no secret that when it comes to the wild cats of Asia—and, really, cats in general—tigers get all the press. In fact, tigers—down to an estimated 3,200 individuals—arguably dominate conservation across Asia. But as magnificent, grand, and endangered as the tigers are, there are a number of other felines in the region that are much less studied—and may be just as imperiled.

A new, special edition of Cat News from the IUCN’s Cat Specialist Group attempts to shine a light on Southeast Asia’s other cats: nine small-to-medium sized cats that are not a part of the big cat genus, Panthera. Of these nine, cat conservationists say two are in particular need of research and conservation attention: the flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) and the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus)…

(read more: MongaBay)

photos: Fishing Cat  - Passanan Cutter; Marbled Cat - Andrew Hearn and Jo Ross; Leopard Cat - Ronglarp Sukmasuang; Leopard Cat - - Andrew Hearn and Jo Ross; Flat-headed Cat - Andreas Wilting

latimes:

197 drought maps reveal just how thirsty California has become
creatures-alive:

Gineta… by David G.Malo on Flickr.
creatures-alive:

(via Resplendent Quetzal by Juan Carlos Vindas / 500px)
libutron:

Hoverfly - Volucella inflata
The colorful hoverfly Volucella inflata (Diptera - Syrphidae) is an European species instantly recognizable by the deep orange markings on the abdomen. Unlike other species of Volucella whose larvae live in the nests of bees and wasps, the larvae of V. inflata inhabit sap runs, and the adults are regular flower visitors.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Nikola Rahmé | Locality: not indicated (2014)

libutron:

Hoverfly - Volucella inflata

The colorful hoverfly Volucella inflata (Diptera - Syrphidae) is an European species instantly recognizable by the deep orange markings on the abdomen. Unlike other species of Volucella whose larvae live in the nests of bees and wasps, the larvae of V. inflata inhabit sap runs, and the adults are regular flower visitors.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Nikola Rahmé | Locality: not indicated (2014)

libutron:

Collared Falconet - Microhierax caerulescens
The five recognized species of Microhierax falconets (Falconidae) are the smallest raptors in the world and show no obvious sexual size or plumage dimorphism. The five species have Asian distribution, from northeast India through Southeast Asia, but they are poorly known.
Field observations have shown that Collared falconets, Microhierax caerulescens, exhibit cooperative hunting and breeding in which chicks are attended by adults birds, males and females.  The chicks are feed directly at the nest either by the males or by the breeding female. This species, being very small (the maximum size of these raptors is up to 18 cm), specializes in insects, which are captured mainly on the wing, either in flight or plucked from the foliage.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Apisit Wilaijit | Locality: Ban Luang, Chiang Mai, Thailand (2013)

libutron:

Collared Falconet - Microhierax caerulescens

The five recognized species of Microhierax falconets (Falconidae) are the smallest raptors in the world and show no obvious sexual size or plumage dimorphism. The five species have Asian distribution, from northeast India through Southeast Asia, but they are poorly known.

Field observations have shown that Collared falconets, Microhierax caerulescens, exhibit cooperative hunting and breeding in which chicks are attended by adults birds, males and females.  The chicks are feed directly at the nest either by the males or by the breeding female. This species, being very small (the maximum size of these raptors is up to 18 cm), specializes in insects, which are captured mainly on the wing, either in flight or plucked from the foliage.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Apisit Wilaijit | Locality: Ban Luang, Chiang Mai, Thailand (2013)